United Nations

United Nations’ declarations, conventions, and covenants — among the most well-known in the world — set social justice standards that nations strive to implement. Many have not been ratified by every U.N. member country. For example, the United States has not signed or ratified CEDAW

Following is a sampling of important U.N. (and U.N. involved) documents:

  • Aarhus Convention (2001)
  • American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man (1948: Latin American)
  • Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) (1979)
  • Convention on Cluster Munitions (2008)
  • Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (1973)
  • Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989)
  • Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees (1951)
  • Declaration of Human Rights (1948)
  • Declaration of the Rights of the Child (1959)
  • Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (2003)
  • Geneva Conventions (1949 and 1977)
  • International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (1966)
  • International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (1966)
  • International Convention for the Suppression of the Financing of Terrorism (1999)
  • International Convention for the Suppression of Terrorist Bombing (1998)
  • International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (1965)
  • International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (2001)
  • Kyoto Protocol (1997)
  • Millennium Development Goals (2000)
  • Norms on the Responsibilities of Transnational Corporations and Other Business Enterprises with Regard to Human Rights (2003)
  • Ottawa Treaty (1997)
  • Protect, Respect, and Remedy: A Framework for Business and Human Rights (2008)
  • United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2007)
  • United Nations Millennium Declaration (2000)